sourdough bread made with a potato flake starter.

Easy to Make Sourdough Bread using a Potato Flake Starter

When I was young, My mom made sourdough bread using this easy to make sourdough bread using a potato flake starter recipe. She would sell the loaves to friends and family members to raise money for Christmas. It was so good and everyone seemed to love it. 

Sourdough Bread Hot Out the Oven

Fast forward about 30 years and mom no longer had any starter left. I begin asking her about the recipe and we couldn’t find ours that was in the family for so long. She scoured the internet and we ultimately adapted ours from the bread recipe on The Southern Lady Cooks.

What is Sourdough Bread?

Sourdough Bread is made from a natural leavening agent. The leavening agent is fermented which gives the bread its sour flavor.

This is also the reason why sourdough bread is a healthier option because the fermented starter is full of probiotics, natural wild yeasts, and good bacteria.

Traditional Sourdough starters use flour and water to ferment. Wild yeasts and bacteria grow on this and this is what causes the bread to rise.

In this case, we are using an easy to make sourdough bread using a potato flake starter which starts with a commercial yeast called active dry yeast to get it started, but then wild yeast takes over after it has fermented.

What Does Sourdough Bread Taste Like?

As the name describes, sourdough is typically sour. The longer you let the starter ferment, the stronger the taste it has. By Using the easy to make potato flake starter, the bread will have a mild flavor.

sourdough bread made with a potato flake starter.
Fresh Sliced Sourdough Bread

It is not quite as sour as traditional sourdough bread and it has a pleasantly sweet taste that most people love. In my opinion is the perfect bread.  

The results will be similar to traditional white bread but will all the great benefits of sourdough bread.

How To Make it

What Ingredients Do I Need?

Active Sourdough Starter

Before you can make Sourdough bread using a potato flake starter, you must first have the starter. The starter takes a few days to make but once it is put together once, you just maintain it by feeding it every few days, then remove the starter you need to make your bread. You will need 1 cup of starter

Active Sourdough Starter Using Potato Flakes

Warm Water

You will need 1 1/2 cups of water that is lukewarm. This should have a temperature range of 95 to 115 degrees Fahrenheit. I like to use my instant-read thermometer to check the temperature.

Salt

Try to use sea salt or Kosher salt if you can. Normal table salt has iodine in it and can give an off-taste. You will need 1 ½ teaspoon of salt

Sugar

You will need ½ cup of White Granulated Sugar. I often use organic cane sugar if I have it on hand. 

Vegetable Oil

You will need ½ Cup of Vegetable oil. I typically use canola or corn oil. I have used Olive oil in the past with great results. If you use olive oil, make sure it is a Light Extra Virgin Olive oil, something with a light taste. 

Flour

In order to make this recipe, you will need either bread flour or all-purpose flour. I like to use unbleached all-purpose flour when I make my bread. Bread flour is great to use as well. Bread flour will give a little more structure to the bread because it has a slightly higher protein count than all-purpose flour. Most people have all-purpose on hand so that is why I recommend going with it. Any brand will do but I tend to like King Arthur flour. You will need 6 cups of flour. 

Follow these steps to Make it

Step 1: In a large bowl, add 1 1/2 cups of lukewarm water. Then add in 1 cup of starter and ½ cup of vegetable oil. 

Adding Lukewarm Water to Starter and Vegetable Oil

Step 2: Next, add the sugar and salt. Mix to dissolve the sugar and salt in the mixture. 

Step 3: Add in the 6 cups of flour. 

Step 4: Mix until all the flour has been incorporated and a ball is starting to form.

 

Ingredients Mixed and Ready to be Dumped on Work Surface

Step 5: Turn the ball of dough out onto a floured work surface. If you have a pastry mat, that works well too. 

Adding Flour to A Pastry Mat so the Dough Does Not Stick

Step 6: Knead until you have a slightly smooth dough ball formed. It should be a little sticky but not too sticky. If you have a stand mixer, use the dough hook and this will make light work out of this step.

Kneading the Dough

Step 7: Place the ball into a clean bowl. I like to add a little vegetable oil to the ball and smear it around. This helps to prevent the dough from sticking to the bowl. I also like to put a little bit of oil on top of the dough to keep it from drying out. 

This is How Your Dough Ball Should Look Like

Step 8: Cover the bowl with a plastic wrap, a tea towel, or a Cheesecloth. You could also use parchment paper to cover it as well. Place in a warm place to let the dough rise for the first time. The rise time will vary but I let mine go overnight. Typically you want to a least let it double in size which should take 4 to 8 hours.  

Step 9: The next day or after the dough has doubled in size, punch the dough down, then turn it out onto a floured surface again. 

Punching the Dough Down

Step 10: Knead for several minutes, then divide the dough in half so both sections are equal amount. 

Step 11: Place the dough into two baking loaf pans, seam side down. I will oil the sides of the pan with Crisco or vegetable oil to keep it from sticking. This will be the second rise. Let the loaves double in size.

This is What the Loaves Look Like after the Second Rise

Step 12: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the loaves for 35 to 40 minutes bake time, or until golden brown. 

Step 14: Remove from the oven and take out of the pans immediately. Place the loaves on a cooling rack uncovered. Let them cool down to room temperature before cutting into them. The crust on the bread has to be set and this cooling down process also lets the remaining moisture escape. This will cause your bread to remain fresher longer. 

Note: This recipe revolves around the feeding of the starter. If you feed the starter in the morning, you will mix the bread up in the evening and bake it the next day. If you feed the starter at night, you will mix the bread up the next morning and then bake it that evening. You can do it however you wish and whatever way it works out best for you. The main thing is to plan it out. 

Here is a Few of My Favorite ways to use this Bread:

sourdough bread made with a potato flake starter.

Easy to Make Sourdough Bread using a Potato Flake Starter

As the name describes, sourdough is typically sour. The longer you let the starter ferment, the stronger the taste it has. By Using the easy to make potato flake starter, the bread will have a mild flavor. When I was young, My mom made sourdough bread using this easy to make sourdough bread using a potato flake starter. She would sell the loaves to friends and family members to raise money for Christmas. It was so good and everyone seemed to love it. 
Course Breads
Cuisine American

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup active sourdough starter see recipe for easy to make sourdough starter from potato flake
  • 1 1/2 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup white granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon sea salt or Kosher salt
  • 6 cups bread or all purpose flour

Instructions
 

  • Step 1: In a large bowl, add 1 1/2 cups of lukewarm water. Then add in 1 cup of starter and ½ cup of vegetable oil.
  • Step 2: Next, add the sugar and salt. Mix to dissolve the sugar and salt in the mixture. 
  • Step 3: Add in the 6 cups of flour. 
  • Step 4: Mix until all the flour has been incorporated and a ball is starting to form. 
  • Step 5: Turn the ball of dough out onto a floured work surface. If you have a pastry mat, that works well too.
  • Step 6: Knead until you have a slightly smooth dough ball formed. It should be a little sticky but not too sticky. If you have a stand mixer, use the dough hook and this will make light work out of this step.
  • Step 7: Place the ball into a clean bowl. I like to add a little vegetable oil to the ball and smear it around. This helps to prevent the dough from sticking to the bowl. I also like to put a little bit of oil on top of the dough to keep it from drying out. 
  • Step 8: Cover the bowl with a plastic wrap, a tea towel, or a Cheesecloth. You could also use parchment paper to cover it as well. Place in a warm place to let the dough rise for the first time. The rise time will vary but I let mine go overnight. Typically you want to a least let it double in size which should take 4 to 8 hours.
  • Step 9: The next day or after the dough has doubled in size, punch the dough down, then turn it out onto a floured surface again.
  • Step 10: Knead for several minutes, then divide the dough in half so both sections are equal amount.
  • Step 11: Place the dough into two baking loaf pans, seam side down. I will oil the sides of the pan with Crisco or vegetable oil to keep it from sticking. This will be the second rise. Let the loaves double in size.
  • Step 12: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the loaves for 35 to 40 minutes bake time, or until golden brown. 
  • Step 14: Remove from the oven and take out of the pans immediately. Place the loaves on a cooling rack uncovered. Let them cool down to room temperature before cutting into them. The crust on the bread has to be set and this cooling down process also lets the remaining moisture escape. This will cause your bread to remain fresher longer. 

Video

Notes

Note: This recipe revolves around the feeding of the starter. If you feed the starter in the morning, you will mix the bread up in the evening and bake it the next day. If you feed the starter at night, you will mix the bread up the next morning and then bake it that evening. You can do it however you wish and whatever way it works out best for you. The main thing is to plan it out.
Keyword easy to make sourdough bread, potato flake sourdough bread, sourdough bread, sourdough bread using a potato flake starter

FAQ’s

How many Loaves will this recipe make?

This recipe will make two loaves of bread if you are using a 9 x 5 bread pan. 

What Size Bread Pan Should I use?

I recommend using a 9 x 5 bread pan. I have used Wilton 9×5 nonstick loaf pans for many years with good success. 

Can I Bake It in a Larger Loaf Pan?

Yes. You might not end up with two loaves that way, but rather one big loaf.

Can I Freeze The Bread After I Bake It?

Yes. I have personally tried this and it works great. Make sure to use a good-quality freezer bag to store it in. Make sure to let the bread cool all the way to room temperature before placing it in the bag. The taste is not quite as good as the day you made it but it will be close.

Thank you for choosing to read this post. We truly hope you enjoyed it. There are not many things better than fresh sourdough bread with butter on it! If you enjoyed this recipe, leave us a comment below. We would love to hear from you.

-Ronnie

Also, try these delicious recipes as well:

Marinade for Smoked Beef Jerky
Chicken Bog | A Traditional South Carolina Dish
Southern Food Junkie Chili
Brunswick Stew
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