Skip to Content

Southern Chicken Bog Recipe (A Traditional South Carolina Dish)

Sharing is caring!

Growing up in South Carolina, you learn about a lot of rice dishes. This particular one is a local favorite for most South Carolinians and a family favorite of ours. Learn how to make this very simple Southern Chicken Bog Recipe, a traditional South Carolina Dish that is not known much outside of South Carolina.

Chicken Bog

What Is Carolina Chicken Bog?

Chicken Bog is a really simple dish but has lots of flavors. It combines chicken, smoked sausage, and rice. That is pretty much the base for it. From there you can change it up however you see fit.

Chicken bog gets its name from the boggy texture of the dish. It is a chicken and rice dish with smoked sausage added in, but the rice is starchy in the way it is cooked. One key note is that the bog recipe doesn’t use cream of chicken to get this texture but it is the way it is cooked that makes it boggy.

Making Southern Chicken Bog.
Cooking Southern Chicken Bog

Where Did Chicken Bog Originate?

The history of this dish has its roots in the South Carolina Low Country, where most of the rice dishes of the state originated. Some even say that the name comes from the bogs of the low country. That is up for debate though as no one knows the history behind the name.

It is said to have originated around the Florence-Darlington area and there is even a Chicken Bog Festival in Loris, SC as they claim to be the capital of Chicken Bog.

Being a native of South Carolina I grew up eating this dish as well as many other Southern dishes that originated in South Carolina such as Boiled Peanuts or Low Country Boil.

If you love dishes that combine chicken and rice, another great one that I make is this Creamy Slow Cooker Chicken and Broccoli over rice or this Quick and Easy Chicken and Vegetable Stir Fry.

Variations of Names for Carolina Chicken Bog

As with any regional dish, Chicken bog has variations and different names. Some parts of the state call this dish Chicken Perlo or chicken pilau. Some cook it in different ways with different ingredients.

What Does Chicken Bog Taste Like?

Chicken bog is a great one-pot meal that does not require any sides, but we sometimes have sides with it. It is a great dish to feed large crowds as you can stretch it by adding more rice to it.

Some prefer the texture to be thick or what I call sticky, and some prefer it with a little more broth. Chicken Bog is a really simple dish but has lots of flavors. It combines chicken, smoked sausage, and rice. That is pretty much the traditional recipe.

From there you can change it up however you see fit. The dish gets its flavor from the broth. I like to start with the smoked sausage and render out the juices from it to give the broth a nice rounded flavor.

The smoked sausage adds a different dimension to it with a smokey flavor.

What You Need to Make This Recipe

Let’s cover the simple ingredients needed to make this recipe

​Ingredients for Southern Chicken Bog

Chicken

Whole chicken is best to use when making chicken bog. I like to stew my chicken in a large pot or Dutch oven. I will add carrots, onions, celery, and garlic to the pot while it is cooking.

If you do not have time to cook the chicken on the stovetop, the best thing to do is to use a slow cooker like a Crockpot or even an instant pot to make this process quicker.

If you do not have a whole chicken, you can use Whole split chicken breast, boneless chicken breasts, or chicken thighs. I prefer the whole chicken because the fat that is rendered out from the skin and the flavor from the bones makes this dish in my opinion.

White Rice

I prefer to use White rice and I like to use long grain rice. Some recipes call for parboiled rice or even a mixture of long grain and parboiled. I tend to stick with just long-grain white rice and I like the texture it gives in this dish. You will need three cups of long-grain white rice.

Smoke Sausage

I prefer to use Hillshire Farms smoked sausage. You will need one sixteen-ounce package of smoked sausage for this recipe.

Butter

I like to add a half stick of butter to this dish as it is near the end of the cooking cycle. This adds flavor and richness to the dish.

Garlic

You will need two to three cloves of garlic minced

Onions

You will need one medium onion diced

Salt

I like to use Sea Salt or Kosher Salt. You will need

Kosher Salt

Black Pepper

Oil

You will need one tablespoon of oil such as olive oil, canola oil, or bacon fat.

Optional Ingredients:

Celery and Carrots

When I am stewing my chicken, I will add these ingredients to my pot to make my chicken broth or chicken stock. This will then be strained and then used to cook the rice. You can also add in a hot sauce when you are cooking the dish although I prefer to add it on top after I have dipped my bowl up.

How To Cook Southern Chicken Bog

Preparation:

Step 1: Start by preparing your chicken. Take out the insides if they are included (neck, gizzards). Wash and pat dry. Salt and pepper the chicken then set aside.

Step 2: Slice the Smoked sausage into 1-inch pieces.

Cooking

Step 3: Grab your large stock pot or Dutch oven. Turn on to medium-high heat. Add in your tablespoon of oil and your smoked sausage. Sear the meat.

Step 4: Add in your onion and garlic. Cook until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes.

Step 5: Place your chicken in your pot and fill it up with water till the chicken is covered.

Step 6: Turn your heat to medium-low heat with the lid on it. Make sure to cook the chicken low and slow. If you cook it on a boil your chicken will be tough.

Step 7: Once the chicken is done, roughly forty-five minutes to an hour, remove the chicken and pick the meat from the bone.

Step 8: Then, measure out 6 cups of broth from your pot and set it aside.

Step 9: Afterwards, remove the remaining ingredients from the pot and set them aside.

Step 10: Next, add your rice to the pot. Turn heat to medium-high and lightly toast the rice. Remember to constantly stir the rice so it doesn’t burn.

Step 11: Add in the 6 cups of broth and stir.

Step 12: Add the remaining ingredients to the pot. Place the lid back on and bring it to a boil.

Step 13: Once it starts to boil, turn the heat down to medium-low so the dish can simmer.

Step 14: Now, add in the half stick of butter and place the lid back on the dish.

Step 15: Finally, simmer the stew until almost all the liquid is gone and the rice is done. This should take 20 to 30 mins. Stir a couple of times during this process to keep the rice from sticking.

Note: Once the rice is done and you have the desired wetness to the rice, it is ready to eat. We prefer ours on the sticky side with not much broth remaining. Some prefer more broth in theirs so you can use the leftover broth to adjust this at the end.

Serving

  • South Carolina Chicken bog is traditionally served with white loaf bread and topped with a hot sauce such as Texas Pete.
  • For sides, you can serve it with green beans and corn.
  • If you want to get fancy with it, you can add green onions, Italian seasoning, or other items that you wish.
  • Chicken bog is also a great meal to serve when camping because it feeds a large crowd and is a simple one-pot meal.

Conclusion

Chicken Bog is a delightful Southern dish that marries simplicity with incredible flavor. Its humble ingredients come together to create a comforting and satisfying meal that’s perfect for gatherings or cozy family dinners.

With its tender chicken, smoky sausage, and perfectly cooked rice, Chicken Bog embodies the essence of Southern cuisine. Whether you’re a seasoned cook or a beginner in the kitchen, this recipe offers a taste of Southern hospitality that will keep you coming back for more. So, gather your ingredients, follow the steps, and savor the warmth and richness of this classic Southern favorite.

FAQ’s

Can I Use Cream of Chicken or Cream of Celery Soup?

I do not recommend using either of those in this dish. I think once you cook it and the taste it has you will be glad you did not use them.

Can I Use Rotisserie Chicken in this Dish?

Yes, you can use Rotisserie chicken in this dish. If you use rotisserie chicken you will have to buy or make chicken broth separately. The process by which this recipe cooks the chicken in turn makes its own chicken stock so you will just need to get your own chicken stock if you use Rotisserie chicken.

What Do I Do If I Have Leftover Chicken Stock?

If you have leftover chicken stock from making this dish, you can put it in a freezer-safe container and freeze it to use at a later date and time.

What Do I Do With Left Over Chicken Bog?

Do you seriously have some left over? Haha. Well if you do, you can store it in a refrigerator-safe or airtight container for up to 3-4 days in the refrigerator. You could also use some of the leftover chicken stock to pour back onto it when you reheat it.

What makes chicken bog different from other chicken and rice dishes?

Chicken Bog stands out with its specific combination of ingredients, including smoked sausage, and its unique name. It’s a beloved Southern specialty dish from South Carolina with its distinct flavor.

Is This Dish Similar to Southern Chicken and Rice?

Yes, this dish is similar to Southern Chicken and Rice with the fact that Carolina Chicken Bog is usually boggier (Sticky) and includes Smoked Sausage.

I truly appreicate you stopping by Southern Food Junkie. I hope you enjoyed this content not only learning how to make this dish but also some history about it as well. If you liked it, please leave us a comment and share our content. This really helps us grow. Thanks and remember, Let’s Get Food Junked!

-Ronnie

Check out these other recipes that you are sure to love as well:

Yield: 6 People

Southern Chicken Bog Recipe (A Traditional South Carolina Dish)

Southern Chicken Bog Recipe (A Traditional South Carolina Dish)

Growing up in South Carolina, you have a lot of rice dishes. This particular one is a local favorite for most South Carolinians. Learning how to make it is very simple with this Southern Chicken Bog Recipe, a traditional South Carolina Dish.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 whole chicken
  • 3 cups rice
  • 1 16oz package of Smoked Sausage
  • 1/2 stick of butter
  • 2-3 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 medium onion diced
  • 1 tablespoon Oil, I used bacon grease but you can use what you like
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Step 1: Start by preparing your chicken. Take out the insides if they are included (neck, gizzards). Wash and pat dry. Salt and pepper the chicken then set aside.
  2. Step 2: Slice the Smoked sausage into 1 inch pieces.
  3. Step 3: Grab your large stock pot or dutch oven. Turn on to medium high heat. Add in your tablespoon of oil and your smoked sausage. Sear the meat.
  4. Step 4: Add in your oinon and garlic. Cook until oinon is translucent, about 5 minutes.
  5. Step 5: Place your chicken in your pot and fill it up with water till the chicken is covered.
  6. Step 6: Turn your heat to medium-low heat with the lid on it. Make sure to cook the chicken low and slow. If you cook it on a boil your chicken will be tough.
  7. Step 7: After chicken is done, roughly forty five minuets to an hour, remove chicken and pick the meat from the bone.
  8. Step 8: Measure out 6 cups of broth from your pot and set aside.
  9. Step 9: Remove the remaining ingredients from the pot and set it aside.
  10. Step 10: Add your rice to the pot. Turn heat to medium-high and lightly toast the rice. Remember to contantly stir the rice so it doesn't urn.
  11. Step 11: Add in the 6 cups of broth and stir.
  12. Step 12: Add in the remaining ingredients to the pot. Place lid back on and bring to a boil.
  13. Step 13: After it starts to boil, turn heat down to medium-low so the dish can simmer.
  14. Step 14: Add in the half stick of butter and place lid back on the dish. Adding butter to make Southern Chicken bog.
  15. Step 15: Simmer until almost all liquid is gone and rice is done. This should take 20 to 30 mins. Stir a couple of times during this process to keep rice from sticking.

Notes

Once the rice is done and you have the desired wetness to the rice, it is ready to eat. We prefer ours on the sticky side with not much broth remaining. Some prefer more broth in theirs so you can use the leftover broth to adjust this at the end. 

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1 grams

Amount Per Serving: Unsaturated Fat: 0g

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Melanie

Thursday 17th of November 2022

My Daddy, whose family come from the Midlands and the Low Country, used to make chicken bog just from a whole chicken and rice. He never added in anything else and it was just amazing. Like you said, the fat from the chicken made such a huge difference in taste! I usually add in the celery, carrots and onions, just to have some vegetables lol. I am going to try it with the smoked sausage because that just sounds amazing! I love finding the history behind so many of our SC foods! I discovered a few years back that historians credit the Low Country with creating barbeque, which gives credibility and weight to my assertion that mustard based BBQ is the best!

Richard Norton

Thursday 14th of September 2023

@Ronnie Williams, according to my grandfather, a local politician was stumping in Hartsville. At the end of his speech, he said, "Now, let's go bog some chickens", and the name was born. Anyhow, they use to make it at his Moose lodge in a large black iron cauldron.... Gave it a very distinct flavor and texture. Thanks for posting... Recipe had been in my family for a long time!

Richard Norton

Thursday 14th of September 2023

@Ronnie Williams,

Ronnie Williams

Thursday 17th of November 2022

Hey and thanks for your comment. It seems that no matter who you talk to, chicken bog is made differently from family to family around the state. It even has different names it goes by. I too love learning about the history and culture of food from South Carolina. That is why I always try to include a little history in my post. I hope others enjoy that as much as you and I. In my opinion, I wouldn't have this dish without the smoked sausage. It really makes the dish. I too will add onions, carrots, and celery sometimes. I always tell people to make it their own. Thanks for stopping by!

Alyssa | wayward

Thursday 15th of September 2022

Chicken Bog is a full Baader-Meinhof phenomenon for me! I only learned of this dish a few months ago (at Carowinds, of all places), and now I feel like I am seeing it everywhere - which is alright by me, as it's delicious!

Ronnie Williams

Saturday 17th of September 2022

Isn't that weird how that happens? That always happens to me when I am interested in buying a new vehicle, then it seems like every vehicle I see is that type that I was shopping for haha. I never knew Carowinds served it. That is interesting. This recipe has actually been on my website and my YouTube channel for many years, maybe since 2016 or 2017. I recently updated the content on it! Thanks for your comment, I appreciate it.

Rick

Tuesday 24th of September 2019

I find that 16 oz. of sausage isn't enough. I have to add two packages. :)

Southern Food Junkie

Tuesday 24th of September 2019

I tend to agree with you Rick. You can never have enough smoked sausage Right? I appreciate you comment.

Lucy

Saturday 11th of August 2018

Love chicken perlo, "bog" or "church lady chicken n rice" (because they make the best perlo!!) I am moving that way and really appreciate your reviews. I am always looking for hidden gems.

Southern Food Junkie

Saturday 11th of August 2018

Thanks for your support, Lucy. I really appreciate it! You can also find us on YouTube and we have a Roku channel as well.

goatsandgreens

Tuesday 3rd of July 2018

BTW, I love your logo tag: "Let's get food junked!" At any rate, I wonder why they call this dish "Bog"? Has to be a story somewhere? I'm bookmarking this, because... well, just because.

Southern Food Junkie

Thursday 5th of July 2018

Thanks for the love. There are many reason or theories why they call it bog. One is that the chicken is bogged down in the dish. Another is that the dish is boggy or sticky. And the last reason or theory is that the area it derives from, what we call the Low Country, has lots of swampy lands or boggy land. No one really knows the true meaning behind the name but these are just theories. I appreciate you stopping by.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to Recipe

Sharing is Caring

Help spread the word.